Wednesday, May 6, 2009

Yellow Variations
24 x 20 Oil on Linen

In the art world there is an implied power structure. Anything cutting edge, no matter how well or how badly done, is at the top. Next is anything that used to be cutting edge but is now dull edged. Then what never had an edge but was none the less considered to be a new idea within what is known as modernism. Finally there is anything that has a germ of an association with anything before the modern era. In the field of what is known as representational painting, or traditional, or classical, or to some people old fuddy duddy obsolete painting, there is also a hierarchy. Here those that do large figure compositions are at the top. Followed by those whose figures stand alone, then figures in landscapes, landscapes without figures, and the lowest of the low, still life. Which brings me to my current painting. Yellow Variations starts out with virtually no respect in the art world. Flowers? Please, give me a break. Well, at least they're well painted. And the title isn't so bad, it suggests the painting isn't really about the flowers. Maybe it incorporates some abstraction. And, hey wait a minute, the coffee pot is from a drip coffee maker and that vase is a milk carton. Those things are modern. This could be considered a modern painting. What if it's like a retro thing? Yeah, retro with a modern twist. That's kind of cool. Maybe retro is the new new. This might be the next big thing, it could be...cutting edge.....

2 comments:

Dale Sherman Blodget said...

Well, you didn't even mention the faces in the muffins. Subliminal caricature, isn't it? haha. It's good to just paint, without giving too much thought to era, labels, etc. (BTW, how do you define your style? Natural classicism? I was going to add that I'm kidding, but truthfully, I'm curious! So, I guess I should delete the sentence preceding the parentheses.)

I hope to see you soon!

Dona M said...

Tom...Your pyramid of importance got me thinking, perhaps you have found the "new, new"......I have felt that Giorgio Morandi did.